“Who are YOU?”


said the Caterpillar. This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, “I–I hardly know, sir, just at present– at least I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.”

In a training I had recently for work, we spent some time on a section called “Dealing with Diversity” (a classic title that always has me shaking my head) and we were told to write down at least five cultural dimensions that reflect who we are. Just for fun, I encourage you to also do this before reading further.

Here’s what I wrote:

  • Faith
  • Multiethnic
  • Low income
  • Single/independent
  • Female
  • A liberal
  • College graduate
  • Native English speaker
  • Non-profit employee
  • World traveler

…there are of course, many other dimensions to me, as to all of us.

Then we were asked to share how we are stereotyped by some of our cultural associations. Take a moment and think about some ways you might also be stereotyped by what you put down on your list and how some of those stereotypes may  not be accurate to you.

This exercise I think helped many of us understand that you can’t just judge a book by its cover. I believe that stereotypes work only as a framework to suggest possibilities when interacting with individuals or communities, but not to be used as assumptions or labels. It’s a pretty important thing for me to remember as I work in an Asian counseling center with a vast range of diversity among primarily the Asian Pacific Islander population in Seattle. Lots of dynamics there.

I won’t mention them all, but here are some assumptions often made about a couple of my cultural aspects: 1) my Christian theology and my liberalism are mutually exclusive. Most Christians I have interacted with assume I have more conservative values and most liberals I interact with assume I am not a Christian based on my liberal opinions. 2) Because I am a native English speaker and fluent in the dominant North American culture, people assume this is who I am. In fact, I don’t always feel like I can associate myself with the dominant American culture; such is true otherwise: I do not always feel like I can relate to the Latin culture and ethnic groups.

Based on the two observations above, I don’t feel that there is one predominate culture group I associate myself with. I’m so evenly divided in many cultural aspects and I’m afraid I have slipped between the socio-politico cracks. I find myself in the gray area, the no-man’s land of culture because I am unique.

But aren’t we all? The purpose of the cultural exercise is, of course, to show how none of us fit exactly into a cookie cutter. At least, those of us who live in a non-homogenous culture. The best that we can offer when interacting with others is the respect that we may all feel differently, view things differently, make decisions differently, and believe differently. Like Alice, we probably change several times a day that who’s to be sure of who we are?

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